History of Battery D (West Point Battery)

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Battery D
(West Point Battery)
5th U.S. Artillery

Attached to Stone’s Expedition, 1st Brig. 2d Div. Army of N.E. Va. (Jun to Aug 1861), then to W.F. Smith’s Brigade Division of the Potomac, to Oct 1861.

Attached to Porter's Division, Army Potomac, Oct 1861 to Mar 1862.

Artillery, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army Potomac, to May 1862.

Artillery, 1st Division, 5th Army Corps, Army Potomac, to May 1863.

Artillery Brigade, 5th Army Corps, to Dec 1863.

Camp Barry, Washington, D.C., 22nd Army Corps, to Mar 1864.

Artillery Brigade, 5th Army Corps, to Nov 1864.

Consolidated with Battery "G" Nov 1864.

Artillery Reserve, Army Potomac, to Jun 1865.

Dept. of Washington, D.C., 22nd Army Corps, to ----


From Official Records Series III, Vol. 1, p. 23

NOTE.--Engineer Company A left the West Point Military Academy January 18, and the West Point Battery (afterward known as D, Fifth Artillery) left same post January 31, both for Washington, D.C


From Official Records Series III, Vol. 3, p. 1041

I also respectfully call attention to our artillery organization. In the Fifth Regiment of U.S. Artillery each battery is allowed one captain, four lieutenants, eight sergeants, and twelve corporals; and all of these, together with the privates, receive cavalry pay and allowances. In the First, Second, Third, and Fourth Regiments of U.S. Artillery, a battery is allowed one captain, three lieutenants, four sergeants, and four corporals, and, with the exception of two batteries to each regiment, for which special allowance was made by laws enacted on March 2, 1821, and March 3, 1847, all of these receive the pay and allowances of infantry; yet they are all, with the exception of four or five companies, performing precisely similar duties.

A field battery of six guns absolutely requires all the officers and non-commissioned officers allowed in the Fifth Artillery, and the additional responsibility of the officers and labor of both officers and enlisted men render necessary the additional pay and allowances accorded by law to those grades in that regiment.

A simple remedy for these evils is the enactment of a law giving the First, Second, Third, and Fourth Regiments of U.S. Artillery the same organization and same rates of pay as the Fifth Regiment; which, it may be added, is also the same as that already given to all the volunteer field batteries now in the U.S. service.


Reference: Official Records Series III.
Compiled and Edited by: Tom Prisk.

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