History of Battery I

Campaign History of Battery I  |  Unit Histories

2nd Battery I
(Wilmington Horse Artillery or Southerland’s Battery)
10th North Carolina State Troops
(1st Regiment North Carolina Artillery)

        This battery of horse artillery, known as "Wilmington Horse Artillery," was from New Hanover Country and transferred to the 10th Regiment N. C. State Troops (1st Regiment N. C. Artillery) from the 36th Regiment N. C. Troops (2nd Regiment N. C. Artillery) in November 1863. While in the 36th Regiment N. C. Troops (2nd Regiment N. C. Artillery) served as Company A; being the first of two batteries so designated it 1st Company A, 36th Regiment N. C. Troops (2nd Regiment N. C. Artillery). On transferring to the 10th Regiment N. C. State Troops (1st Regiment N. C. Artillery) in November 1863, it was designated 2nd Company I, being the second battery to receive that designation. However, it was more frequently referred to as "Southerland’s Battery," after its Captain, Thomas J. Southerland.

        At the time of its transfer the battery was stationed at Wilmington. However, before the end of 1863 it was ordered to North East, where it remained through February 1864. From there it was sent to Mansonboro Sound where it remained through June 1864 when it was transferred to Camp Davis, near Wilmington. Here, it appears, the battery was divided into three sections of two guns each and each section sent to defensive positions in the Cape Fear District. In August 1864 the battery was reported as being equipped with five 6-pounder guns and one 12-pounder howitzer.

        In December 1864 all the sections were recalled and the battery was sent to Sugar Loaf Hill where it took part in the repulse of a Federal attempt to capture Fort Fisher on December 25, 1864. With the fall of Fort Fisher and the evacuation of Wilmington the battery retired with Major General Robert F. Hoke’s command and joined the Army of Tennessee under General Joseph E. Johnston and was attached to Lieutenant Colonel Joseph B. Starr’s Battalion of Artillery. It was in this organization when the army was surrendered on April 26, 1865. The battery was officially paroled at Greensboro May 1, 1865.


Reference: North Carolina Troops 1861-1865 - A Roster edited by Manarin and Jordan.
Compiled and Edited by: Lisa Van Goethem and David Stanley.

Campaign History of Battery I  |  Unit Histories